Fairy tales do come true…

Once upon a time

the Princess met her Prince…

and they lived happily ever after.

Rebecca and Joshua were married at Saint Ignatius College, Riverview and their reception was held at Curzon Hall, Marsfield.

I love the balcony scene. It reminded me of one of those grand royal type settings…fit for a Princess and Prince don’t you think? To wrap up the fairy tale with a enchanting silhouette was just perfect… just like in those old classic children’s picture books made up of beautiful marbling silhouettes. A very romantic end… “and they lived happily ever after”.

Congratulations Rebecca and Joshua.

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Wind in the Willows

I took this image at a recent wedding on a 100 acre estate in the beautiful Southern Highlands at Gibraltar Country Club Hotel & Spa, Bowral.

This particular spot was the area chosen for the ceremony. The bride and groom were married on this very island under the willow tree. How romantic is that? After all the guests had left I took advantaged of this enchanting area. You could just picture it being a perfect scene from the classic novel, ‘Wind in the Willows’. I was just imagining Mole, Ratty, Mr Badger and Mr Toad coming round the island in their rowing boat.

Oh well, not quite but it certainly made a wonderful backdrop for this beautiful wedding.

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Corinne - 13/10/2012 - 6:12 am

Wow! Peter this is GORGEOUS!!!
I hope we can get something styled like this in our wedding photos! 🙂
Obviously different settings but I love this picture!!

Mt Tomah Wedding – Belinda & Stuart

Despite Winter putting on it’s last show snowing the night before, it was a glorious crisp sunny day for the first day of Spring. Belinda and Stuart had a delightful intimate wedding ceremony in the tree terrace. Mt Tomah is such a stunning backdrop for weddings. There are so many wonderful settings for different photo opportunities. One of my favourite moments was when a gush of wind disturbed the smooth flow of the waterfall and resembled the curls at the end of the bride’s hair. I thought it was quite incredible as you can see in one of the photos below and in my previous blog.

Belinda wore a stunning dress that she designed and had a reversible coat (very sensible for the cool mountain air) that was silver lined. At the end of the day we walked down to another part of the garden for some last shots where there was a beautiful silver birch tree. How gorgeous was that with Belinda’s silver lined coat. The sun then peaked with majestic silver rays of light. Perfect!

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nicole landgrebe - 28/09/2012 - 8:10 am

This is stunning Peter, gorgeous couple and amazing place….. you captured them so well……… Im sure they love them all!

Peter - 28/09/2012 - 1:45 pm

Hi Nicole,

Thank you so much for taking the time to write your lovely comments. Yes they are indeed a gorgeous couple and Mt Tomah is a stunning place. I love capturing weddings there.

Marina and Michael… an Assyrian Affair

I had a wonderful cultural wedding to shoot last weekend. It was my very first Assyrian wedding in 26 years of photographing weddings. It was so lovely to watch and capture on camera. They have some lovely traditions that I was able to witness on the day. I have included some images below. I did some research in Wikipedia to try and explain some of these traditions as best as I can.

M’Pulata d’Chalo…
A tradition symbolic of the bride leaving the home of her parents. Usually the bride is in her home taking pictures with family and the groom’s family visits to take her out of the home and to the church. While in the house, the women sing tradition lilyaneh and dola and zurna is played as they dance. Before the bride leaves the house, a member of the bride’s family usually a cousin, niece/nephew,uncle/aunty etc… stands at the door and receives an amount of money from a member of the grooms family usually a Father, or brother, the amount is decided by who’s holding the door.

Burakha…
The wedding tradition where the bride and groom are blessed by a priest in a church. The burakha traditionally lasted about four hours, but more recently the event goes for about one hour. Pins in the shape of two crosses are usually placed on the groom’s back.

Now the photo of the bride’s foot on top of the groom’s foot was implying that she has the dominating strength in their life together now! I don’t think this was an Assyrian tradition somehow. I think it was something more worldly! I always thought the man was the head of the house. In the case of my own wedding, the minister said I was the head but my wife was the neck that turns my head!

Well I hope that helps give you a bit of background to some of the images. Oh, and they sure know how to dance! I have never seen so much dancing!

It was certainly a beautiful day. The ceremony was held at St. Hurmizd Cathedral, Greenfield Park and the reception was at Le Montage, Lilyfield. Enjoy the photos!

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